How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways | You can find a Mac's serial number through the About This Mac menu, by locating the number on the physical device, or online. Here's how.

How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways

How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways

How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways

How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways

How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways

How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways
How to find your Mac computer’s serial number in 3 different ways
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There are several ways to find the serial number on your Mac.
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There are several ways to find the serial number on your Mac.
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Apple

  • You can find a Mac’s serial number both through the About This Mac menu, and by locating the number on the physical device.
  • As long as your Mac is connected to your Apple ID account, you should also be able to find the serial number even if you’re not at the computer through the Apple ID website.
  • You’ll need to know your Mac computer’s serial number in order to have it repaired under warranty, and to help you recover the device if it’s lost or stolen.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Most days, it hardly matters what your Mac serial number is. Who cares about a random series of letters and numbers?

But if you ever need to use your warranty and have Apple repair your Mac, you’ll need that serial number. And if your computer is ever lost or stolen, the police will care about the serial number too.

So while you might never need to know it, it’s still a good idea to know how to find your Mac serial number. Here’s how.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

MacBook Pro (From $1,299.99 at Best Buy)

How to find your Mac’s serial number

The easiest way to find a Mac’s serial number is to click the Apple logo at the top left corner of the screen, then click About This Mac. You’ll find the serial number in the “Overview” tab of the window that opens.

The

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The “About This Mac” window can also give you useful information about what type of computer you have.
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William Antonelli/Business Insider

If your computer is turned off or won’t turn on, you can flip your Mac over and find the serial number physically printed on the hardware. Look for the text beginning with “Designed by Apple in California,” and then look at the lowest line of writing, where you’ll find the serial number.

Don't turn a Mac upside down while it's actively running, as that can damage the hard drive.

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Don’t turn a Mac upside down while it’s actively running, as that can damage the hard drive.
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William Antonelli/Business Insider

If you don’t have your Mac close at hand, but the computer is linked to your Apple ID account, then use another device to go to appleid.apple.com.

There you can log in and then scroll down to the Devices section, and click on your Mac’s name to get its serial number.

You can see the serial numbers of all your devices here.

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You can see the serial numbers of all your devices here.
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William Antonelli/Business Insider

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

Personal information from thousands of Sprint, AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile customers was accidentally left exposed — here’s how to check if you were affected

Personal information from thousands of Sprint, AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile customers was accidentally left exposed — here’s how to check if you were affected

A man walking past a Sprint store in New York City.
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A man walking past a Sprint store in New York City.
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Reuters

  • The personal data of hundreds of thousands of cell subscribers was left exposed on an unprotected server.
  • The exposure, first reported by TechCrunch, occurred after a contractor working with Sprint left subscribers’ phone bills unprotected on a server hosted by Amazon Web Services.
  • Phone bills affected by the exposure belonged to subscribers of Sprint, AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Hundreds of thousands of cell subscribers’ personal information was accidentally left unprotected on a cloud server hosted by Amazon Web Services, according to a report from Fidus Information Security.

The data exposure includes names, addresses, phone numbers, and users’ call histories, TechCrunch first reported. Some users’ login information, including usernames, passwords, and PINs, was also exposed. Phone bills affected by the exposure included those of subscribers of AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile, which were in Sprint’s possession because of a promotion in which Sprint compared its prices to users’ current cell plans.

It’s not clear whether hackers accessed the data while it was exposed. A Sprint representative told Business Insider that “the error has been corrected.”

The server was owned by a third-party contractor working with Sprint, and it was hosting phone bills of users switching from other cell providers to Sprint. That third-party contractor was the marketing firm Deardorff Communications, its president, Jeff Deardorff, confirmed to TechCrunch.

Data exposures are a fairly common security risk in the realm of cloud storage. This risk is especially heightened when data is being shared with third-party contractors, which are less likely to possess the security infrastructure and know-how to protect user data, according to cybersecurity experts.

“Cloud data storage systems are inherently dangerous … safely leveraging cloud databases requires very specific, robust operating standards,” Kelly White, the CEO of the cyberrisk software company RiskRecon, told Business Insider. “Even if an organization chooses to not leverage certain cloud database technologies due to their inherent hazard, it is certainly the case that their third-parties do.”

How to find out whether you’re affected

Federal rules require companies to inform customers when their personal data is affected by an exposure. According to Sprint, all impacted customers will be notified, but it’s unclear whether Sprint or the third party, Deardorff Communications, is assuming responsibility for that role (a Deardorff Communications representative did not immediately respond to Business Insider’s request for comment).

As such, if you’re a Sprint customer or someone who considered switching to Sprint, the simplest way to find out whether you’re affected is to contact Sprint directly.

If you aren’t a Sprint customer and never participated in a Sprint promotion to compare your phone bill to Sprint’s prices, you’re most likely unaffected by the exposure.

Just to be safe, it’s wise to change the password and PIN associated with your cell provider.

Trump’s trade wars were supposed to rescue US manufacturing and agriculture. But his policies have made them significantly worse.

Trump’s trade wars were supposed to rescue US manufacturing and agriculture. But his policies have made them significantly worse.

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Jeff Swensen / Stringer

  • Throughout his presidency, Trump sought to rescue segments of the economy he believed were abandoned by politicians at home and battered by competitors abroad, like US manufacturing and agriculture.
  • The opposite occurred instead as American manufacturing is slumping and farmers have suffered painful losses.
  • Trump appeared ready to scale back his ongoing trade wars recently, but those expectations were shattered when the president announced he was imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum from Brazil and Argentina on Monday.
  • Some economists say the president’s protectionist policies are inflicting more pain rather than restoring industries to full strength like he intended.
  • “The two most trade-exposed sectors are manufacturing and agriculture,” Ted Alden, a trade expert and senior fellow at the Council of Foreign Relations, told Business Insider.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Trump is suiting up to be “Tariff Man” once again.

A year ago, Trump proclaimed himself a “Tariff Man” in a tweetstorm about the trade war with China. He raged about trading practices that threatened American prosperity and said his fiery approach was “the best way to max out our economic power.”

Throughout his presidency, Trump has sought to rescue segments of the economy he believed were abandoned by lawmakers at home and battered by competitors abroad. He particularly wanted to prop up US manufacturing and farming – both symbolic of an era when they formed dominant parts of the 20th century economic engine.

The president sparked a trade war with China early last year, slapping tariffs on the world’s second largest economic power as well as friendly trading partners in a bid to shore up those sectors’ fortunes.

The opposite occurred instead. American manufacturing is slumping and farmers have suffered painful losses, as the total value of agricultural exports to China has been more than halved since 2017. Trump appeared ready to scale back his ongoing trade wars recently.

But those expectations were shattered when the president announced he was imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum from Brazil and Argentina on Monday, dragging two of the largest South American economies into the dispute.

He alleged they were manipulating their currencies – a claim that experts reject – and making it harder for American farmers to compete. The president also threatened tariffs on French imports.

donald trump make farmers great again

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Some economists say the president’s protectionist policies are inflicting more pain rather than restoring American industries to full strength. Paul Krugman called it “the paradox” of the Trump economy: The very industries he’s tried aiding are now worse off than before.

“He gave corporations a massive tax cut that was supposed to produce surging investment – but business investment is down,” Krugman said in a tweet. “He launched a trade war to make manufacturing great again, but industry is shrinking.”

As Trump heads into next year’s election, he’s finding that a good economy is easy to promise but much harder to deliver. As he doubles down on his fiercely combative approach to trade, the effect of Trump’s policies are rippling through sectors with constituencies crucial to his re-election.

“The two most trade-exposed sectors are manufacturing and agriculture,” Ted Alden, a trade expert and senior fellow at the Council of Foreign Relations, told Business Insider, adding that made them susceptible to retaliation from other countries wanting to strike back at the United States.

Manufacturers have suffered significantly, but productivity remains strong

As a candidate in 2016, Trump pledged to revive the manufacturing sector and bring jobs back from overseas.

But manufacturing is tumbling into a deeper recession, shedding jobs as its being thrown into uncertainty that’s slowing investment decisions from business leaders.

The ISM Manufacturing reading, an important index, showed a continuing decline in the demand for new orders and inventories when it was released on Monday, contracting for the fourth month in a row.

“All this trade friction is weighing on the manufacturing sector, reminding us that protectionism is not a victimless crime,” Kristina Hooper, chief global market strategist at Invesco, told the Washington Post.

Alden said the sector weathered a particularly strong hit from the tariffs.

“The manufacturing industry has been hurt by the rising cost of imported components and by the retaliatory tariffs that has affected their finished products when they get exported,” Alden said. “So they’ve faced a double whammy.”

Theodore Moran, a Georgetown University professor and senior fellow at the Peterson Institute of International Economics, told Business Insider that using tariffs to boost employment at home represents an “old-fashioned” way of thinking about the global economy.

Moran noted that businesses have designed international supply chains to bolster their competitiveness at home, keeping production costs low. Tariffs only raise the prices of goods, he says, making it more likely manufacturers will shed workers to save money.

But though manufacturing jobs are being lost – mostly the product of decades-long technological changes – productivity remains high in the sector. Data from the Federal Reserve Bank in St. Louis shows the sector’s output has steadily increased since the Great Recession. That belies the image of a weakening industry.

“You can’t measure the strength of US manufacturing only on the jobs,” Claude Barfield, a resident scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute and former consultant to the Office of the US Trade Representative, told Business Insider. “What’s really happening is that technology is moving in.”

Farmers have endured severe losses in the trade war

Back in January, Trump told 5,000 farmers gathered for the American Farm Bureau Convention that he’s locking in trade deals that would boost their

“We’re doing trade deals that are going to get you so much business, you’re not even going to believe it. Your problem will be: ‘What do we do? We need more acreage immediately. We got to plant,'” Trump said.

Trump signed a limited trade deal with Japan in October that would reduce barriers for US beef, pork, wheat and other farm goods, but its benefits wouldn’t make up for lost sales to China.

Farmers have endured severe losses in Trump’s trade wars. Sales of soybean, pork, wheat, and many other agricultural goods to China are drying up, and the country is turning to alternatives like Brazil and Canada to fill the void.

The loss of export markets creates large hurdles for US farmers trying to re-enter them, according to Matt McAlvanah, the spokesperson for Farmers for Free Trade, a pro-trade advocacy group.

McAlvanah previously told Business Insider: “It’s very difficult to regain markets farmers have spent decades cultivating. These relationships are built over time, they’re built on trust – and when they go away overnight, they don’t come back overnight.

Farm bankruptcies are also up 24% from last year, according to the American Farm Bureau. The Trump administration rolled out a $28 billion bailout package for farmers who have lost significant income to staunch the losses.

Though Trump said he wants to resolve the trade war, he doesn’t appear to be in any rush. The president told reporters in London on Tuesday that a trade deal with China could “wait until after the election.”

He added: “But they want to make a deal now, and we’ll see whether or not the deal’s going to be right, it’s got to be right.”

However, the uncertainty the trade war is causing will not be ending anytime soon. Trump may yet slap another $100 billion worth of tariffs on December 15. With no end in sight, that threatens to drag down investment further and slow economic growth, according to Barfield.

“If you’re a businessman in the United States, Europe, Brazil, France, it’s hard to plan. How do you know what this crazy guy is gonna do next?” he said.

‘Why does my Roku keep buffering?’: How to fix Roku streaming issues in 3 ways

‘Why does my Roku keep buffering?’: How to fix Roku streaming issues in 3 ways

When your Roku stream keeps buffering, here are the first steps you should take.
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When your Roku stream keeps buffering, here are the first steps you should take.
source
Reuters

  • If your Roku keeps buffering and you can’t stream video effectively, there are a few ways you can fix it.
  • You should first check the Wi-Fi signal strength on your Roku – if it’s poor, you can improve the signal by moving your Wi-Fi router closer to your Roku device, reducing the use of other devices on the network, or upgrading your router.
  • It’s also a good idea to restart your Roku, or even try to manually reduce the bitrate your Roku is using to stream.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Because Roku media players are streaming devices, there may be times when video doesn’t play smoothly.

But if your Roku is frequently pausing playback to buffer, there’s something wrong.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

Roku Ultra (From $99.99 at Best Buy)

Google Wifi (From $99 on Amazon)

Linksys EA7500 Dual-Band Router (From $125.98 on Amazon)


Why your Roku keeps buffering, and how to fix it

Often, the number one cause of unwanted buffering is a weak or unreliable Wi-Fi connection. Here’s what you can do to improve your Wi-Fi:


Improve your Wi-Fi connection

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The first thing you should do is check your signal strength to see if the Roku is connecting properly.
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Dave Johnson/Business Insider

First, you’ll want to check your Roku’s Wi-Fi signal strength.

Using your Roku remote, select “Settings,” then “Network,” and choose “About.” Look for your signal strength – if it’s listed as Fair or Poor, you should try some of the suggestions below to improve the signal.

1. Move the Wi-Fi router closer to the Roku. If the router is far away, or blocked by an object in some way, your Wi-Fi speed can be seriously compromised.

2. Reduce the use of other devices on the network. Check to see if other devices – streaming players, computers, or gaming systems – are also online at the same time. You may need to limit those other devices to give the Roku more of your network bandwidth.

3. Upgrade or replace your router. If your router is several years old, it might not be up to the task. The router’s software might also be out of date. If possible, update the router’s firmware, or replace it with a newer model that supports a high-speed 5GHz network. You may want to consider Google’s Wi-Fi router, or this Linksys router for larger homes.


Restart your Roku

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Depending on which Roku device you have, there are different ways to restart it.
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Dave Johnson/Business Insider

Of course, any time you encounter an unexpected problem with a device like your Roku, “rebooting” it can help eliminate temporary glitches.

Completely power off the Roku and restart it to see if that eliminates the buffering problems. For tips on how to do this for different Roku models, check out our article “How to turn off any Roku device.”


Manually override the Roku bitrate

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Manually adjusting the maximum bitrate may, in some situations, improve your buffering.
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Dave Johnson/Business Insider

Most of the time, your Roku automatically (and correctly) chooses the right bitrate for video streaming based on your network speed.

In some rare situations, though, you can improve playback by manually overriding this setting – so if you have tried everything else, give this a try as well.

1. Using the Roku remote, press the following sequence of buttons to get to a hidden settings screen: Press Home five times, press reverse scan three times, and then press forward scan twice.

2. You’ll now see the Bit Rate Override screen. Select “Manual selection.”

3. Choose a lower bitrate and then test your Roku to see if that has solved your buffering problem.

If none of these fixes work, you may want to contact Roku or your internet service provider to get further help with your buffering issues.

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

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