How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed | To update AirPods to the latest firmware, make sure they're in their charging case, the case is charging, and it's near your iPhone.

How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed

How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed

How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed

How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed

How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed

How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed
How to make sure your AirPods update to the latest firmware version, and check which version is installed
  • By: businessinsider.sg
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To update your AirPods, charge them near your iPhone.
caption
To update your AirPods, charge them near your iPhone.
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Crystal Cox/Business Insider

In an effort to make owning and maintaining your AirPods feel effortless, Apple doesn’t make you update your AirPods manually. In fact, there’s no way to update them manually at all.

Instead, when updates are available, they’re installed automatically.

You can, however, check the firmware version of your AirPods – in other words, what their current update version is – whenever you like.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

AirPods with Wireless Charging Case (From $199.99 at Best Buy)

iPhone 11 (From $699.99 at Best Buy)

When AirPods update automatically

You can’t force your AirPods to install an update, but it’s helpful to know when they’ll perform the update automatically.

Your AirPods will update when:

  • The AirPods are in their charging case.
  • The AirPod case is charging – either plugged into a charging cable or on a wireless charging pad (if they can charge wirelessly).
  • The AirPod case is near your iPhone.

How to check your AirPods’ firmware version

1. Place the AirPods in their charging case.

2. On the iPhone, start the Settings app.

3. Tap “General” and then tap “About.”

4. Open the lid of the AirPods case. The AirPods battery menu will open – close it. You should see an entry for “AirPods” appear under “EID.”

When you open the case, the battery status screen should pop up. You can tap to close it.

caption
When you open the case, the battery status screen should pop up. You can tap to close it.
source
Dave Johnson/Business Insider

5. Tap “AirPods” to see details, including the current firmware version.

Tap AirPods to see their firmware version.

caption
Tap AirPods to see their firmware version.
source
Dave Johnson/Business Insider

Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech:

Former hedge fund trader gets 40 months in prison for tricking investors by overvaluing assets

Former hedge fund trader gets 40 months in prison for tricking investors by overvaluing assets

source
Reuters

  • Jeremy Shor, a former trader at shuttered hedge fund Premium Point Investments, was sentenced to 40 months in prison on Monday, Bloomberg reported.
  • Shor was convicted in July for conspiring with the fund’s co-founder to inflate the value of the firm’s assets in order to win over new investors and keep existing clients.
  • Premium Point co-founder Anilesh “Neil” Ahuja – who was also found guilty in July – is scheduled for sentencing next week, according to Bloomberg.
  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more stories.

A former hedge fund trader was sentenced to spend 40 months in prison for working with the firm’s co-founder to trick investors by overvaluing assets.

Jeremy Shor, a previous employee of shuttered fund Premium Point Investments, was given the sentence by U.S. District Judge Katherine Polk Failla on Monday, Bloomberg reported.

Shor and Premium Point co-founder Anilesh “Neil” Ahuja were both convicted in July for “mismarking” the value of the firm’s assets in an attempt to win over new investors and retain existing clients. Ahuja is expected to face sentencing next week, according to Bloomberg.

Ahuja and one of the fund’s portfolio managers, Amin Majidi, artificially boosted monthly return targets by directing Shor and other traders to alter valuations to meet those figures, according to court filings. The goal, according to the prosecutors, was to bolster the fund’s performance so they could charge clients higher fees.

According to Bloomberg, the prosecutors said Shor played an “instrumental role” in the scheme. Shor told the judge that he should have said something about the valuations and that not doing so “has left me with an indescribable pain and sense of failure I will feel for the rest of my life,” Bloomberg reported.

“I think that Mr. Shor saw the cesspool pretty quickly and jumped right in,” the judge said, according to Bloomberg.

Monday’s sentencing is part of a broader push by the federal prosecutors to crack down on individuals and investment firms inflating the value of assets.

Premium Point was founded in 2008 by Ahuja and focused on structured credit products, according to court filings. The fund began winding down in 2016 and said in 2017 that the Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating its valuations, according to Bloomberg.

Former hedge fund trader gets 40 months in prison for tricking investors by overvaluing assets

Former hedge fund trader gets 40 months in prison for tricking investors by overvaluing assets

source
Reuters

  • Jeremy Shor, a former trader at shuttered hedge fund Premium Point Investments, was sentenced to 40 months in prison on Monday, Bloomberg reported.
  • Shor was convicted in July for conspiring with the fund’s co-founder to inflate the value of the firm’s assets in order to win over new investors and keep existing clients.
  • Premium Point co-founder Anilesh “Neil” Ahuja – who was also found guilty in July – is scheduled for sentencing next week, according to Bloomberg.
  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more stories.

A former hedge fund trader was sentenced to spend 40 months in prison for working with the firm’s co-founder to trick investors by overvaluing assets.

Jeremy Shor, a previous employee of shuttered fund Premium Point Investments, was given the sentence by U.S. District Judge Katherine Polk Failla on Monday, Bloomberg reported.

Shor and Premium Point co-founder Anilesh “Neil” Ahuja were both convicted in July for “mismarking” the value of the firm’s assets in an attempt to win over new investors and retain existing clients. Ahuja is expected to face sentencing next week, according to Bloomberg.

Ahuja and one of the fund’s portfolio managers, Amin Majidi, artificially boosted monthly return targets by directing Shor and other traders to alter valuations to meet those figures, according to court filings. The goal, according to the prosecutors, was to bolster the fund’s performance so they could charge clients higher fees.

According to Bloomberg, the prosecutors said Shor played an “instrumental role” in the scheme. Shor told the judge that he should have said something about the valuations and that not doing so “has left me with an indescribable pain and sense of failure I will feel for the rest of my life,” Bloomberg reported.

“I think that Mr. Shor saw the cesspool pretty quickly and jumped right in,” the judge said, according to Bloomberg.

Monday’s sentencing is part of a broader push by the federal prosecutors to crack down on individuals and investment firms inflating the value of assets.

Premium Point was founded in 2008 by Ahuja and focused on structured credit products, according to court filings. The fund began winding down in 2016 and said in 2017 that the Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating its valuations, according to Bloomberg.

Pop-up shelters that can be assembled in 20 minutes without tools could help address California’s mounting homelessness crisis

Pop-up shelters that can be assembled in 20 minutes without tools could help address California’s mounting homelessness crisis

source
Pallet

  • A Washington-based company called Pallet makes pop-up homeless shelters that can be assembled in 20 minutes without any tools.
  • Pallet recently assembled two of these shelters outside Sacramento City Hall to demonstrate the concept.
  • From 2017 to 2019, the number of homeless residents in Sacramento County rose by nearly 20%.
  • The city’s mayor is pushing to have 150 of the pop-up shelters built before winter.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Sacramento City Hall witnessed a demonstration on November 13, but it wasn’t a protest.

For about 20 minutes, workers assembled two pop-up homeless shelters on the sidewalk outside the building without using any tools. Their goal was to demonstrate a potential solution to Sacramento’s mounting homelessness crisis.

From 2017 to 2019, the number of homeless residents in Sacramento County rose by nearly 20%. The city has around 4,000 homeless residents – a small number compared to nearby San Francisco, though the two cities have about the same share of homeless residents relative to their population size (around 0.8%).

The pop-up structures could offer temporary shelter in both these cities, as well as throughout California, which has four of the 10 cities with the largest homeless populations in the US.

In Sacramento, constructing permanent homeless shelters has been a slow process, hampered by a lack of funding and lengthy construction timelines. A single 100-person shelter can take several months to build and cost around $4 million to $5 million, The Sacramento Bee reported.

The shelters that were built outside city hall, however, start at around $4,000. Instead of using tools, workers can fit the white aluminum walls into gray platforms, which can be placed on any surface, paved or unpaved. Each mini pop-up unit is 64 square feet in area and can fit four bunk beds inside. That would make the cost of 25 units (a total of 100 beds) around $200,000. The units are best suited for families or those willing to share a room.

Pallet homeless shelter

source
Pallet

The Washington-based corporation that makes the structures, Pallet, originally designed them to house people during disasters. But after a conversation with city officials in Tacoma, Washington, they realized that the shelters could also work for homeless residents. Each shelter has four fold-out bunk beds, fold-out shelving, and small windows. They can withstand 110 mile-per-hour winds and 1,600 pounds of snow.

Pallet has made a few arrangements with municipal governments to demonstrate the concept in front of local city halls. In April, it assembled a shelter in around 20 minutes outside Seattle’s city hall.

Sacramento mayor Darrell Steinberg recently toured the structures outside his office building.

Homeless shelter interior

source
Pallet

“I love this idea,” Steinberg told the Bee. “I want to see 150 of these before winter.” That could give around 600 people, or 15% of Sacramento’s homeless population, access to a bunk bed.

But the mayor added that large shelters are still vital to address the city’s homelessness crisis. Sacramento recently approved a $21.3 million budget to build and operate two 100-person shelters for the homeless. The city council has also considered designating “safe zones” where people would be permitted to sleep in their cars or camp out in tents. The council will vote on these ideas in December, along with the mayor’s proposal to build the pop-up shelters.

Pallet CEO Amy King told the Bee that local residents may be more likely to approve a temporary shelter than a permanent one.

“It’s not going to be there forever and that’s obvious by looking at it,” she said. “But they look nicer than tents.”

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