'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut | The documentary film depicts the life of Anastasia Biefang as she transitions and takes command of a German military battalion. Biefang says she wante

'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut

'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut

'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut

'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut

'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut

'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut
'I am Anastasia': Germany's first transgender commander makes film debut
  • By: dw.com
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"I am Anastasia," a documentary film about the German military's first transgender commander premiered in theaters on Thursday.

The film follows Lieutenant Colonel Anastasia Biefang as she tells the story about how she came to realize she was transgender and came out to her colleagues at the height of her career when she was 40-years-old.

It also depicts the reactions within the Bundeswehr when she took command of the information technology battalion in the eastern town of Storkow in 2017 after she transitioned.

"I decided to immerse myself unbiased [in the battalion] and decided that everyone was unbiased towards me too," she says in the film's trailer.

Read more: Transgender troops — how open is Germany's army?

Anastasia Biefang (Imago Images/H. Galuschka)

'Everyone has an opinion about me without knowing me,' Biefang said in an interview ahead of the film premier

'Wow! They're just a person'

In an interview on German public broadcaster ARD's political TV talkshow "Maischberger" on Wednesday ahead of the premier, Biefang described the moment she came out to her colleagues at a regular briefing meeting.

"Yes my hair is going to get a bit longer over the next few months," Biefang recalled saying.

To her surprise, the decision to come out to her colleagues in the German military did not have a negative impact on her career — but she notes that it took time for the around 700 soldiers under her command to get to know her.

Most of the prejudices broke down when people in the battalion realized: "Wow! They're just a person," she said.

"I deliberately chose to become visible with the subject. I wanted to pull my head out of the sand and say: 'Hey, there are transgender people in the Bundeswehr, too,'" Biefang said.

"I am Anastasia" opened in theaters across Germany on November 21, with showings in Berlin, Frankfurt, Munich, Hamburg, Dresden and Leipzig.

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'We just want the same rights as you'

This is how much employees earn in Germany

This is how much employees earn in Germany

Ever wondered what employees working in Germany take home every month? These figures shed some light on average incomes.

Perhaps you're thinking of getting a job in Germany and wondering what the average wages are. Or maybe you're already based in the country and you're curious to see how your salary measures up to others.

Whatever the case, look no further – here's a rundown of some interesting stats that give a flavour of what employees pocket every month.

If you take all employees in Germany – that’s both full-time and part-time workers – the average salary according to Statista, the German online portal for statistics, is around €2,860 (as of 2017).

After all deductions, the average net salary is around €1,890 per month, said Bavarian news site Merkur.de in a recent report.

People who work full-time in the Bundesrepublik (35 to 40 hours a week is common in many companies), receive an average of €3,770 gross per month.

But women and men still earn different amounts. The gender pay gap in Germany, i.e. the wage gap between men and women, is around 22 percent in favour of men. Men who work full-time earn earn about an average of €3,960 per month (gross), while women working full-time have to make do with just €3,330.

This is the unadjusted pay gap (this means that variables were not taken into account). According to the Federal Statistical Office, a large chunk of the gender pay gap can be explained by the different occupational and sector choices of men and women.

Women also often work less than men, for example in part-time or mini-jobs.

Source: Statista (as of 2017)

What we know about the killing of former German president's son

What we know about the killing of former German president's son

Indian couple go on trial in Frankfurt for spying on Sikhs

Indian couple go on trial in Frankfurt for spying on Sikhs

An Indian couple accused of spying on Sikh and Kashmiri communities in Germany went on trial Thursday on charges that carry a sentence of up to 10 years in prison.

The suspects were charged in March and have been named only as Manmohan S., 50, and his wife Kanwal Jit K., 51, in keeping with German privacy rules for defendants.

Their trial was being held in a court in Frankfurt.

"Manmohan S. agreed... to provide information about Germany's Sikh community and Kashmir movement and their relatives to an employee of the Indian foreign intelligence service Research & Analysis Wing," prosecutors said in a statement earlier this year.

His wife joined him in monthly meetings with the Indian intelligence officer between July and December 2017, and in total the couple were paid €7,200.

Sikhs in Germany number between 10,000 and 20,000 -- their third biggest community in Europe after Britain and Italy, according to the religious rights group REMID.

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